JCMR ARTICLES 13.2

A critical discourse analysis of masculinities portrayed in Zimbabwean voluntary medical male circumcision posters

October 01, 2021
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Abstract Masculine norms and perceptions are correlated to men’s health and often result in rejection of ‘health-positive’ behavio...

Abstract

Masculine norms and perceptions are correlated to men’s health and often result in rejection of ‘health-positive’ behaviour. As such, widespread hegemonic masculine ideologies in Zimbabwe seem to hinder an effective uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) recommended for HIV prevention. In this context, the study postulates that the masculinities projected in PSI Zimbabwe VMMC posters are contrary to existing hegemonic masculine notions so as to promote medical circumcision. Through a critical discourse analysis method, guided by the theory of hegemonic masculinity, this study establishes the nature of masculine identities in the studied VMMC posters, juxtaposed to the prevailing perceptions of manhood in the Zimbabwean society. It is concluded that VMMC posters diverge from the powerful and authoritative view of manhood and depict non-hegemonic male figures. Given this paradox, there is need for the designers of VMMC posters to develop realistic male images so as to enhance familiarity and acceptability.

 

Key Words: Masculinity, Identity, VMMC Posters, HIV and AIDS, Zimbabwe.

 

JCMR Journal of Communication and Media Research, Vol. 13, No. 2, October 2021, pp. 51-62

 

© Association of Media and Communication Researchers of Nigeria (AMCRON).

 

About the author

*Clemenciana Mukenge, Ph.D., is a lecturer in the Department of Creative Media and Communication, University of Zimbabwe, Hararre, Zimbabwe. Her research interests are in: HIV and AIDS communication, Language and Media, ‘New Englishes’ and English as a Second Language.

 

Full Article

Words: 7,863

Pages: 12

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Article Citation

Mukenge, C. (2021). A critical discourse analysis of masculinities portrayed in Zimbabwean voluntary medical male circumcision posters.  Journal of Communication and Media Research, 13 (2): 51 – 62.

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